The Effect of Press Variation on Color Stability on 7-color and 4-color Process

Details

Document ID: 
150176
Author(s): 
Matthew Furr
Year: 
2015
Pages: 
9

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Abstract

Gamut is defined as a subset of colors which can be accurately represented in a given circumstance, such as within a given color space or by a certain output device.

Printing technology has advanced quite rapidly--particularly in packaging. Improved inks, plates, anilox rolls, presses, prepress applications and separations have enabled converters to move from the traditional limitation of 'spot' colors, to a more expanded, advanced, computerized screen and process printing technique using process inks.

This has led printers to consider implementing expanded gamut. Expanded gamut is the use of producing a wider set of colors by adding more than the traditional set of CMYK process inks. The process of expanded gamut is very attractive to printers who, if not constrained by replacing brand color inks after every press run, can speed up makereadies because they do not have to clean ink units on press. More significantly, they can gang jobs together, because ink colors are not created by special inks, but just process builds.

Until recently, particularly with flexo printing, the biggest concern with this practice was the stability of the plates and presses. Could they consistently and predictably hold the dots to assure accurate reproduction within tight tolerances of important colors--like those required by brands and traditional solid Pantone inks? However, improved inks, plates, anilox rolls, presses, prepress applications and separations have enabled converters to move from the traditional limitation of 'spot' colors, to a more expanded, advanced, computerized screen and process printing technique using process inks.

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