Technology

VA Supreme Court: Michael Mann Needn't Turn Over All His Email

Slashdot - 2 hours 50 min ago
RoccamOccam sends news that the Virginia Supreme Court has ruled that Michael Mann, a climate scientist notable for his work on the "hockey stick" graph, does not have to turn over the entirety of his papers and emails under Freedom of Information laws. Roughly 1,000 documents were turned over in response to the request, but another 12,000 remain, which lawyers for the University of Virginia say are "of a proprietary nature," and thus entitled to an exemption. The VA Supreme Court ruled (PDF), "the higher education research exemption's desired effect is to avoid competitive harm not limited to financial matters," and said the application of "proprietary" was correct in this case. Mann said he hopes the ruling "can serve as a precedent in other states confronting this same assault on public universities and their faculty."

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Supreme Court Justices Say They’re Likely To Rule On NSA Surveillance

TechCrunch - 3 hours 14 min ago
 Supreme Court justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Antonin Scalia think that the nation's top court will eventually rule on the NSA's surveillance activities. The two, appearing in front of the National Press Club, both touched on the subject, with Justice Scalia calling the Supreme Court the "the institution least qualified to decide" on the matter, and Justice Ginsburg stating that "[the court]… Read More

Camera deals of the week: 4.18.14

Engadget - 3 hours 24 min ago
Snatching up a new camera can be a considerable investment, especially if you're after a unit that combines stellar images with a host of features. Fret not friends: We're here to help. Just beyond the break, you'll find a handful of photo gadgets...

Ask Slashdot: What Tech Products Were Built To Last?

Slashdot - 3 hours 40 min ago
itwbennett writes: "When you think about tech products these days, you probably think 'refresh cycle' more than 'built to last.' But there are plenty of tech products that put up with hard, daily use year after year. Here's a few to get you started: Logitech MX510 mouse, Brother black & white laser printer, Casio G-Shock watch, Alvin Draf-Tec Retrac mechanical pencil, Sony Dream Machine alarm clock. What's your longest-lasting, hardest-working device?"

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Facebook Paper got its first big update today, but is anyone using it?

Engadget - 3 hours 57 min ago
Here's a shocker: Facebook's first major update to Paper, its socially augmented news-reading app, makes it more social. Specifically, the app's 1.1 update now allows users to comment on posts using photos, as well as added birthday and event...

Airbnb Has Closed Its $500M Round Of Funding At A $10B Valuation, Led By TPG

TechCrunch - 4 hours 18 min ago
 TechCrunch has learned that Airbnb, the fast-growing site that lets people become hoteliers by renting out sofas, rooms or entire private homes, has now closed its latest round of funding: $500 million, led by private equity firm TPG, at a $10 billion valuation, according to our sources. This brings the total raised by Airbnb to $826 million. Read More

Facebook Says Paper Users Browse 80 Stories A Day, Adds Features That Let It Replace FB For iOS

TechCrunch - 4 hours 23 min ago
 Facebook just released Paper 1.1, an update that adds features and notifications to make it a more comprehensive substitute for Facebook for iOS. It also gave the first momentum update on Paper since its Febraury 3rd launch, saying "people have explored an average of 80 stories a day". It didn't release a user count, though, and some critics are calling it a flop. Read More

Samsung's Position On Tizen May Hurt Developer Recruitment

Slashdot - 4 hours 42 min ago
CowboyRobot sends in an article about how Samsung's constantly shifting plans for its smartwatches are making it hard for developers to commit to building apps. Quoting: "Samsung's first smartwatch, released in October last year, ran a modified version of Google's Android platform. The device had access to about 80 apps at launch, all of which were managed by a central smartphone app. Samsung offered developers an SDK for the Galaxy Gear so they could create more apps. Developers obliged. Then Samsung changed direction. Samsung announced a new series of smartwatches in February: the Gear 2, Gear 2 Neo, and Gear Fit. Unlike the first device, these three run Samsung’s Tizen platform. ... This week, Samsung made things even more interesting. Speaking to Reuters, Yoon Han-kil, senior vice president of Samsung’s product strategy team, said the company is working on a watch that will use Google’s Android Wear platform. In other words, Samsung will bring three different watches to market with three different operating systems in under a year."

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The Open Source Initiative hopes public awareness is Heartbleed's 'silver lining'

Engadget - 4 hours 48 min ago
​Looking for a positive take to cut though all the negative press that Heartbleed has been getting? Then the Open Source Initiative (OSI) has one. The news has been full of stories about the exploit in OpenSSL (itself, an open-source project) that...

FCC sets up the 'incentive auction' that will lead to better wireless internet for everyone

Engadget - 5 hours 12 min ago
Last week at the NAB (National Association of Broadcasters) show, FCC head Tom Wheeler pushed broadcasters to loosen their grip on spectrum that the agency plans to auction off to give wireless internet room to grow. Now, he's laid out a draft of the...

Who Wants A Ticket To The Disrupt NY Hackathon?

TechCrunch - 5 hours 21 min ago
 Ready. Set. Go. Our events team just released another batch of tickets to the Disrupt NY Hackathon. You can grab one below. Last year using the Foursquare and Plaid APIs, a credit card transaction tracker took home the top prize. Teams are forming now so grab a ticket while they're still available. Read More

Taking On Amazon, Target Expands Online Subscriptions Program To More Categories, Lowers Prices

TechCrunch - 5 hours 26 min ago
 Target has significantly expanded its subscription-based e-commerce service, first launched last fall as a response to Amazon’s popular “Subscribe and Save” program, by increasing the number of online items available for subscription purchase from just 200 to now 1,500. While the company’s original focus was on baby-care items, the now revamped service offers similar… Read More

Detroit: America's Next Tech Boomtown

Slashdot - 5 hours 26 min ago
jfruh writes: "Over the past few years, the growth rate in Detroit tech jobs has been twice the natural average. The reason is the industry that still makes Detroit a company town: U.S. automotive companies are getting into high tech in a big way, and need qualified people to help them do it. Another bonus: the rent is a lot cheaper than it is in San Francisco. '[A]ccording to Automation Alley's 2013 Technology Industry Report, the metro Detroit area grew to a total of 242,520 technology industry jobs in 2011, representing a 15% increase from the 2010 level of 210,984 technology industry jobs. No other benchmarked region had greater technology industry growth than metro Detroit in this period. Further, according to the report, this growth helped propel metro Detroit to a ranking of fourth among the 14 benchmarked regions, passing San Jose."

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Telerik Open Sources Most Of Its Kendo UI HTML5 Framework

TechCrunch - 5 hours 33 min ago
 Telerik, the company behind the popular Kendo UI library, this week announced that it is open sourcing the vast majority of Kendo UI's tools and JavaScript framework features. This new Kendo UI Core package is licensed under the Apache 2.0 license, which allows developers to use it for both commercial and non-commercial projects. Read More

You found a planet!: Robert Simpson crowdsources scientific research and accelerates discovery at Zooniverse

TED Blog - 5 hours 43 min ago
  Scientific research is generating far more data than the average researcher can get through. Meanwhile, modern computing has yet to catch up with the superior discernment of the human eye. The solution? Enlist the help of citizen scientists. British astronomer and web developer Robert Simpson is part of the online platform Zooniverse, which lets more than one […]
Categories: Technology

Sony Xperia Z2 review: a big, powerful slab of a phone

Engadget - 5 hours 48 min ago
It's been nearly three years since I reviewed the Xperia Neo, manufactured by what was then Sony Ericsson. The Neo represented just the second generation of Xperia phones running on Android, from a period when Sony was finding its feet in the world...

La Belle Assiette Launches Its On-Demand Chef Service In Belgium And The U.K.

TechCrunch - 5 hours 58 min ago
 French startup La Belle Assiette just opened shop in Belgium. La Belle Assiette is a sort of on-demand chef service. You can browse the site, find your chef and book a meal directly from the service — a chef will then come to your home or office. The startup will also roll out its offering in the U.K., Switzerland and Luxembourg in the next six weeks. Here’s how the service works. Next… Read More

Bug Bounties Don't Help If Bugs Never Run Out

Slashdot - 6 hours 8 min ago
Bennett Haselton writes: "I was an early advocate of companies offering cash prizes to researchers who found security holes in their products, so that the vulnerabilities can be fixed before the bad guys exploited them. I still believe that prize programs can make a product safer under certain conditions. But I had naively overlooked that under an alternate set of assumptions, you might find that not only do cash prizes not make the product any safer, but that nothing makes the product any safer — you might as well not bother fixing certain security holes at all, whether they were found through a prize program or not." Read on for the rest of Bennett's thoughts.

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The Engadget Podcast is live at 12PM ET!

Engadget - 6 hours 18 min ago
After last week's Very Special Episode, we've grabbed a Hair of the Dog (or two...or three), a bit of rest, and we're back for a regular ol' episode of The Engadget Podcast. We're discussing a triplet of topics that are assuredly close to your heart...

Elite soldiers will soon ride into battle on stealthy hybrid motorcycles

Engadget - 6 hours 21 min ago
The US' special operations forces frequently can't rely on conventional ground transportation for their covert ops -- a loud engine is guaranteed to blow their cover. To tackle this problem, DARPA has just awarded Logos Technologies a contract to...