Technology

14 ingenious hacks for problems you didn't know you had

Engadget - 7 hours 26 min ago
People can be crazy, yo. But where there's a will, there's a way that can lead to all sorts of fantastic oddities in the gadget world. Today's community of hackers, makers and DIY fanatics oftentimes work together to find solutions to problems we did...

NVIDIA SHIELD Android TV Reviewed: Gaming and Possibly the Ultimate 4K Streamer

Slashdot - 7 hours 50 min ago
Earlier this week, NVIDIA officially launched its SHIELD Android TV set-top device, with far more horsepower than something like Roku or Apple TV, but on par with an average game console, and at a more affordable price tag of $199. MojoKid writes: What's interesting, however, is that it's powered by NVIDIA's Tegra X1 SoC which features a Maxwell-derived GPU and eight CPU cores; four ARM A57 cores and four A53s. The A57 cores are 64-bit, out-of-order designs, with multi-issue pipelines, while the A53s are simpler, in-order, highly-efficient designs. Which cores are used will depend on the particular workload being executed at the time. Tegra X1 also packs a 256-core Maxwell-derived GPU with the same programming capabilities and API support as NVIDIA's latest desktop GPUs. In standard Android benchmarks, the SHIELD pretty much slays any current high-end tablet or smartphone processor in graphics, but is about on par with the octal-core Samsung Exynos in terms of standard compute workloads but handily beating and octal-core Qualcomm Snapdragon. What's also interesting about the SHIELD Android TV is that it's not only an Android TV-capable device with movie and music streaming services like Netflix etc., but it also plays any game on Google Play and with serious horsepower behind it. The SHIELD Android TV is also the first device certified for Netflix's Ultra HD 4K streaming service.

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Take A Walk With Us Through Google I/O 2015

TechCrunch - 8 hours 44 min ago
 What’s it like to be at Google I/O? Here’s a walking tour of this year’s show floor at Moscone West, from registration all the way up to the inner den of the press room. Read More

Microscopic Underwater Sonic Screwdriver Successfully Tested

Slashdot - 8 hours 52 min ago
afeeney writes: Researchers at the University of Bristol and Northwestern Polytechnical University in China have created acoustic vortices that can create microscopic centrifuges that rotate small particles. They compare this to a watchmaker's sonic screwdriver. So far, though, the practical applications include cell sorting and low-power water purification, rather than TARDIS operations. Appropriately enough, one of the researchers is named Bruce Drinkwater.

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Recommended Reading: The new and improved 'Halt and Catch Fire'

Engadget - 8 hours 56 min ago
Recommended Reading highlights the best long-form writing on technology and more in print and on the web. Some weeks, you'll also find short reviews of books that we think are worth your time. We hope you enjoy the read. Hard Reboot: The Excellen...

21 amazing quotes from TEDWomen 2015

TED Blog - 9 hours 5 min ago
After two days of TEDWomen 2015,  the jaw-dropping, standing-O moments are still hanging in the air — smart, sad and funny insights on things we don’t often say out loud … “I am a bad feminist and a good woman. I am trying to become better in how I think and say and do — without abandoning what makes […]
Categories: Technology

The War On Crypto Terror

TechCrunch - 9 hours 25 min ago
 Governments are scared of software. This month, the Commerce Department proposed to classify “intrusion software” as dual-use civilian/military technology; the UK announced a law which will require “Google, Facebook and other internet giants” to “give British spies access to encrypted conversations”; and the Justice Department claimed APIs should be… Read More

Untethered Miniature Origami Robot That Self-Folds, Walks, Swims, and Degrades

Slashdot - 9 hours 59 min ago
jan_jes writes: MIT researchers demonstrated an untethered miniature origami robot that self-folds, walks, swims, and degrades at ICRA 2015 in Seattle. A miniature robotic device that can fold-up on the spot, accomplish tasks, and disappear by degradation into the environment promises a range of medical applications but has so far been a challenge in engineering. This work presents a sheet that can self-fold into a functional 3D robot,actuate immediately for untethered walking and swimming, and subsequently dissolve in liquid. Further, the robot is capable of conducting basic tasks and behaviors, including swimming, delivering/carrying blocks, climbing a slope, and digging. The developed models include an acetone-degradable version, which allows the entire robot's body to vanish in a liquid. Thus this experimentally demonstrate the complete life cycle of this robot: self-folding,actuation, and degrading.

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12 short films by female filmmakers, played at TEDWomen 2015

TED Blog - 11 hours 55 sec ago
Anyssa Samari finds the interstitials for TED Conferences — the short videos that run between speakers as palate-cleansers. “It’s like a Rubik’s Cube,” she says. “There are a lot of constraints—the videos can’t be too long, they need to tell a narrative, they need to be beautiful and they need to fit the theme of the session. […]
Categories: Technology

Google Photos Launches With Unlimited Storage, Completely Separate From Google+

Slashdot - 12 hours 34 min ago
An anonymous reader writes with a report that Google yesterday announced at its I/O conference a photo-storage site known as Google Photos. Says the article: The new service is completely separate from Google+, something Google users have been requesting for eons. Google is declaring that Google Photos lets you backup and store "unlimited, high-quality photos and videos, for free." It's a bit creepy to see all the photos that Google still has on tap, including many that I've since deleted on my phone.

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'Halo 3: ODST' is rolling out for Xbox One, check your inbox

Engadget - 13 hours 17 min ago
From one bug-ridden console game to another -- Halo: Master Chief Collection owners should check their Xbox One inbox this morning, as redemption codes for the Halo 3: ODST add-on are going out now. Arriving as an apology for problems gamers reported...

The Case For a Muon Collider Succeeding the LHC Just Got Stronger

Slashdot - 15 hours 19 min ago
StartsWithABang writes: If you strike the upper atmosphere with a cosmic ray, you produce a whole host of particles, including muons. Despite having a mean lifetime of just 2.2 microseconds, and the speed of light being 300,000 km/s, those muons can reach the ground! That's a distance of 100 kilometers traveled, despite a non-relativistic estimate of just 660 meters. If we apply that same principle to particle accelerators, we discover an amazing possibility: the ability to create a collider with the cleanliness and precision of electron-positron colliders but the high energies of proton colliders. All we need to do is build a muon collider. A pipe dream and the stuff of science fiction just 20 years ago, recent advances have this on the brink of becoming reality, with a legitimate possibility that a muon-antimuon collider will be the LHC's successor.

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Third Stage Design Problem Cause of Most Recent Proton Failure

Slashdot - 18 hours 6 min ago
schwit1 writes: The Russian investigation into the latest Proton rocket failure has concluded that the failure was caused by a design failure in the rocket's third stage. The steering third stage engine failed due to excessive vibration as a result of an imbalance in a rotor of a pump unit. While it is always possible for new design issues to be discovered, I wonder why this problem hadn't been noticed in the decades prior to 2010, when the Proton began to have repeated failures.

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Sony promises 'Ultra Street Fighter IV' PS4 patch next week

Engadget - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 11:55pm
The launch of Ultra Street Fighter IV on the PlayStation 4 hasn't exactly gone as planned, with gamers complaining of input lag, shoddy netcode, glitches, a start screen that refers to a button on the controller that doesn't exist and other issues. T...

Google's solar plane crashed earlier this month in New Mexico

Engadget - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 10:43pm
According to Bloomberg Business, the National Transportation Safety Board is investigating an incident wherein Google's solar-powered Solara 50 plane reportedly crashed shortly after takeoff. The event occurred on May 1st at a private airfield outsid...

Stanford Researchers Make Photonic Components Faster, With Algorithmic Design

Slashdot - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 9:19pm
retroworks writes: Integrated photonic devices are poised to play a key role in a wide variety of applications, ranging from optical interconnects and sensors to quantum computing. However, only a small library of semi-analytically designed devices is currently known. In an article in Nature Photonics, researchers demonstrate the use of an inverse design method that explores the full design space of fabricable devices and allows them to design devices with previously unattainable functionality, higher performance and robustness, and smaller footprints than conventional devices. The designed a silicon wavelength demultiplexer splits 1,300nm and 1,550nm light from an input waveguide into two output waveguides, and the team has fabricated and characterized several devices. The devices display low insertion loss (2dB), low crosstalk (100nm). The device footprint is 2.8×2.8m2, making this the smallest dielectric wavelength splitter.

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US military tests a Tinker Bell-sized drone

Engadget - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 9:08pm
There's no standard set for the shape or form of drones, and the Army plans to use that to its advantage. Here's where the Black Hornet Nano comes in. This micro drone, designed by Norway-based firm Prox Dynamics, is small enough to fit in the palm o...

Google's Cardboard Design Lab teaches VR with (what else) VR

Engadget - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 8:29pm
Google debuted its larger and more robust Cardboard VR headset at I/O yesterday, now it needs some apps that actually run on it. However, designing a program in a virtual 3D environment is quite different than designing one to run on a 2D touchscreen...

The Unbundling Of Finance

TechCrunch - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 8:00pm
 In a world where everything is being unbundled, allowing consumers to pick and choose from things like television shows and college courses, financial services are becoming a la carte as well. People, particularly millennials, are moving away from single monolithic banking institutions serving the majority of their financial needs to hand picking the specialized services that work for them. Read More

First Ultraviolet Quantum Dots Shine In an LED

Slashdot - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 7:40pm
ckwu with word that South Korean researchers have created the first UV-emitting quantum dots, and employed them in the creation of a flexible LED. Their achievement is notable because no one has previously succeeded in making quantum dots capable of emitting light at wavelengths shorter than 400 nm, which defines the upper range of the UV spectrum. Writes ckwu: To get quantum dots that emit UV, the researchers figured out how make them with light-emitting cores smaller than 3 nm in diameter. They did it by coating a light-emitting cadmium zinc selenide nanoparticle with a zinc sulfide shell, which caused the core to shrink to 2.5 nm. The quantum dots give off true UV light, at 377 nm. An LED made with the quantum dots could illuminate the anticounterfeiting marks on a paper bill. The article names a few applications of the technology, besides, including water sterilization and industrial applications.

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