Technology

Engadget Daily: iPhone 6 and 6 Plus review, the future of virtual payments and more!

Engadget - 20 min 38 sec ago
Did you hear? iOS 8 is ripe for the picking, and lucky for you, we've already taken it for a test drive. Read on for Engadget's news highlights from the last 24 hours, including our iPhone 6 and 6 Plus review, everything you need to know about...

You'll be able to drive a car in 'Final Fantasy XV'

Engadget - 54 min 38 sec ago
Timed perfectly for this year's Tokyo Game Show, Square-Enix's unveiled a new teaser for its next (long in development) Final Fantasy. There's boyband hairstyles, broody protagonists, big-ass swords... and a fancy car you drive around in. Watch, and...

Apple’s Tim Cook Does Some Security Straight Talking

TechCrunch - 1 hour 13 min ago
 Today, Apple’s Tim Cook posted a letter announcing a new security page on the company’s website, publishing some fairly plain-language security talk. There’s some solid language here that is clearly designed to allay fears about the way that Apple protects user data in the wake of the celebrity nude hacking incidents. Cook’s words: We believe in telling you up front… Read More

Tim Cook makes Apple's policies on privacy and security clearer

Engadget - 1 hour 25 min ago
Whatever you think of Apple's commitment to its user's security as of say... two weeks ago, CEO Tim Cook seems to be following up on his promise to bring more clarity to the company's efforts. Tonight he posted a letter to Apple customers on the...

Hampton Creek In A Management Pickle As It Seeks To Raise $50 Million In Funding

TechCrunch - 1 hour 31 min ago
 It hasn’t even been a full two weeks since Ali Partovi switched from an advisor role to chief strategy officer at Hampton Creek. However, the plant-based mayo startup has confirmed that Partovi is out. This leaves the company in a bit of a management pickle. In an odd move, Partovi switched from simply advisor to second in command to CEO and co-founder Josh Tetrick at the beginning of… Read More

Tinba Trojan Targets Major US Banks

Slashdot - 1 hour 34 min ago
An anonymous reader writes Tinba, the tiny (20 KB) banking malware with man-in-the-browser and network traffic sniffing capabilities, is back. After initially being made to target users of a small number of banks, that list has been amplified and now includes 26 financial institutions mostly in the US and Canada, but some in Australia and Europe as well. Tinba has been modified over the years, in an attempt to bypass new security protections set up by banks, and its source code has been leaked on underground forums a few months ago. In this new campaign, the Trojan gets delivered to users via the Rig exploit kit, which uses Flash and Silverlight exploits. The victims get saddled with the malware when they unknowingly visit a website hosting the exploit kit."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








It only takes $9,000 to join this social network

Engadget - 1 hour 53 min ago
True or False: You don't go on Facebook anymore, because it's such a drag not being able to talk about your private jet's new upholstery. After all, a few of your old friends post regularly about student loan and (gasp) mortgage payments, and it'll...

Amazon Announces New Fire Tablets, E-Ink Kindles And A Special Fire For Kids

TechCrunch - 2 hours 37 min ago
 Amazon released six new devices today with an eye on shipping them before the holiday season. The collection, which ranges from a new e-ink tablet called the Voyage to an 8.9-inch tablet that is lighter than the iPad Air and features Fire OS 4.0, an OS based on KitKat, is designed for reading, work and play. There’s also a new Kindle for kids that includes a $25 case and free parental… Read More

Amazon's new budget tablets include 6- and 7-inch sizes, as well as a kids edition

Engadget - 2 hours 38 min ago
Here's the funny thing about Amazon: Because it's already selling you stuff, it has an easy way of knowing when a product category is starting to take off. Case in point: budget tablets. After reading lots of user reviews complaining about cheap,...

Amazon's $200 Kindle Voyage is the Rolls-Royce of e-readers

Engadget - 2 hours 38 min ago
Perhaps Amazon sold a lot of 3G Paperwhites without special offers. Or maybe Kobo's Aura HD has quietly taken the world by storm and Jeff Bezos decided he needed an answer. Whatever the impetus, Amazon has decided there is room in the world for a...

Amazon gives its flagship Kindle Fire HDX 8.9 a modest spec boost

Engadget - 2 hours 38 min ago
If you've ever seen a TV commercial for Amazon's Kindle Fire tablets, you know the company isn't shy about comparing itself to Apple. Indeed, the retail giant is hoping you'll buy its flagship Kindle Fire HDX 8.9 this holiday season instead of a...

The Uber effect: how San Francisco's cab use dropped 65-percent

Engadget - 3 hours 16 min ago
Hailing a ride has never been easier -- just take out your phone, tap on an app and wait for your internet-wrangled chauffeur to arrive. Companies like Uber and Lyft are reinventing the transportation industry, and traditional taxi services are...

ManServant Will Let You Order Around Hot Men For $125 Per Hour

TechCrunch - 3 hours 18 min ago
 A 6’2″, sandy blond gentleman wearing a tailored suit and tie gently bows to greet me and seat me. “Hello, I am Fabio and I will be your man servant this afternoon,” he says. His gentle, hypnotic voice wraps around me. I suddenly realize I’ve been seated and proceed to accidentally knock my sunglasses off the table. Fabio quickly picks them up and then takes out… Read More

Ask Slashdot: Remote Support For Disconnected, Computer-Illiterate Relatives

Slashdot - 3 hours 25 min ago
An anonymous reader writes I use email to communicate with my folks overseas. Their ISP only allows dial-up access to their email account (there is no option of changing ISP), that can receive messages no larger than 1MB nor hold more than 15MB (no hope of changing that either). They are computer-illiterate, click on everything they receive, and take delight on sending their information to any Nigerian prince that contacts them, "just in case this one is true". Needless to say, their PC is always full of viruses and spyware. In my next yearly visit, instead of just cleaning it up, I'd like to gift them with some "hardened" PC to use for email only that would hopefully last the year before someone has to fix it. So far, these are the things I have in mind: Some kind of linux distro, or maybe even mac. Most viruses over there are windows only and propagate via Autorun.inf or by email attachments, not having Windows could prevent both. Some desktop environment that hides anything unrelated to connecting to the net and accessing their account (dial-up software, email client, web browser, exchanging files between their hard disk/email attachments and USB drives). By "hide", I just want the rest to be out of the way, but not entirely removed, so that if necessary, I can guide them over the phone. For this, Ubuntu's Unity seems like a particularly bad solution, but a Gnome desktop with non-removable desktop shortcuts (is this possible?) for the file manager, browser, email client and dial-up program could work. An android system is unlikely to work (they have no wifi, and they were utterly confused with Android's UI). This could be a life saver: some kind of extension to the email client that executes commands on specially formatted emails (e.g., signed with my private key), so that I can do some basic diagnostics or install extra software if I have to. This las point is important: they currently rely on acquaintances who may not be competent (they can't evaluate that) if something happens between my visits. They, most likely, wont know how to deal with anything non-windows, so all tech support would fall on me. (This is the reason I haven't moved them from windows yet.)Another very useful extension would be something to automatically re-assemble attachments split into several emails, to overcome the 1MB message limit. Does any of that exist? If I have to build that system myself (or parts of it), do you have other suggestions? For the inevitable and completely reasonable suggestion of getting someone competent for tech support: I've tried that too. The competent ones don't last beyond the third visit.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Ask Slashdot: Remote Support For Disconnected, Computer-Illiterate Relatives

Slashdot - 3 hours 25 min ago
An anonymous reader writes I use email to communicate with my folks overseas. Their ISP only allows dial-up access to their email account (there is no option of changing ISP), that can receive messages no larger than 1MB nor hold more than 15MB (no hope of changing that either). They are computer-illiterate, click on everything they receive, and take delight on sending their information to any Nigerian prince that contacts them, "just in case this one is true". Needless to say, their PC is always full of viruses and spyware. In my next yearly visit, instead of just cleaning it up, I'd like to gift them with some "hardened" PC to use for email only that would hopefully last the year before someone has to fix it. So far, these are the things I have in mind: Some kind of linux distro, or maybe even mac. Most viruses over there are windows only and propagate via Autorun.inf or by email attachments, not having Windows could prevent both. Some desktop environment that hides anything unrelated to connecting to the net and accessing their account (dial-up software, email client, web browser, exchanging files between their hard disk/email attachments and USB drives). By "hide", I just want the rest to be out of the way, but not entirely removed, so that if necessary, I can guide them over the phone. For this, Ubuntu's Unity seems like a particularly bad solution, but a Gnome desktop with non-removable desktop shortcuts (is this possible?) for the file manager, browser, email client and dial-up program could work. An android system is unlikely to work (they have no wifi, and they were utterly confused with Android's UI). This could be a life saver: some kind of extension to the email client that executes commands on specially formatted emails (e.g., signed with my private key), so that I can do some basic diagnostics or install extra software if I have to. This las point is important: they currently rely on acquaintances who may not be competent (they can't evaluate that) if something happens between my visits. They, most likely, wont know how to deal with anything non-windows, so all tech support would fall on me. (This is the reason I haven't moved them from windows yet.)Another very useful extension would be something to automatically re-assemble attachments split into several emails, to overcome the 1MB message limit. Does any of that exist? If I have to build that system myself (or parts of it), do you have other suggestions? For the inevitable and completely reasonable suggestion of getting someone competent for tech support: I've tried that too. The competent ones don't last beyond the third visit.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








GDC award for culture critic Anita Sarkeesian led to bomb threat

Engadget - 3 hours 45 min ago
A bomb threat was made regarding a speaker and award recipient at the Game Developer's Choice Awards (part of the annual Game Developer's Conference) in San Francisco this past March. Anita Sarkeesian (pictured above), host of Tropes vs. Women in...

Airbnb To Start Collecting Hotel Tax On Rentals In San Francisco

Slashdot - 4 hours 8 min ago
An anonymous reader writes Airbnb announced that it will begin collecting a 14% occupancy tax on behalf of its San Francisco hosts October 1. "This is the culmination of a long process that began earlier this year when we announced our intent to help collect and remit occupancy taxes in San Francisco," wrote Airbnb public policy leader David Owen. The company already collects taxes in Portland, and has discussed the possibility of collecting taxes in New York.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Airbnb To Start Collecting Hotel Tax On Rentals In San Francisco

Slashdot - 4 hours 8 min ago
An anonymous reader writes Airbnb announced that it will begin collecting a 14% occupancy tax on behalf of its San Francisco hosts October 1. "This is the culmination of a long process that began earlier this year when we announced our intent to help collect and remit occupancy taxes in San Francisco," wrote Airbnb public policy leader David Owen. The company already collects taxes in Portland, and has discussed the possibility of collecting taxes in New York.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Airbnb To Start Collecting Hotel Tax On Rentals In San Francisco

Slashdot - 4 hours 8 min ago
An anonymous reader writes Airbnb announced that it will begin collecting a 14% occupancy tax on behalf of its San Francisco hosts October 1. "This is the culmination of a long process that began earlier this year when we announced our intent to help collect and remit occupancy taxes in San Francisco," wrote Airbnb public policy leader David Owen. The company already collects taxes in Portland, and has discussed the possibility of collecting taxes in New York.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








FCC Chairman Wheeler: Title II Is On The Table

TechCrunch - 4 hours 9 min ago
 In the final moments of the FCC’s public comment period on its notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) concerning net neutrality, there was a spike in input regarding precisely how bad regulating ISPs under Title II of the Communications Act of 1934 would be. To summarize the corporate response: Oh god, please no. Please. Read More