Technology

Michigan's new law 'clarifies' ban on Tesla's direct sales model

Engadget - 45 min 36 sec ago
If you're hoping to find a Tesla Motors store in Motor City, you may be waiting a long, long time. Michigan Governor Rick Snyder has signed House Bill 5606 into law, explicitly banning Tesla's direct sales model in the state. Snyder contends that the...

Carvey Is A Powerful CNC Machine For The Rest Of Us

TechCrunch - 1 hour 3 min ago
 Robotic CNC machines – cutting systems that use spinning tools to swipe through metal, wood, and plastic – are cool but ugly. Most of them are as big as a fridge and designed to carve out objects in a few minutes but none will sit quietly on your desk and do its business with aplomb and elegance. Now, however, there’s Carvey. Carvey is the Form 1 of CNC. Designed to be a… Read More

All 'Simpsons' episodes are now available for streaming

Engadget - 1 hour 9 min ago
The wait is over, people of the interwebs. Right on cue, Fox has launched Simpsons World, the online hub where it will be streaming every Simpsons episode ever broadcasted. Even though the content is free to browse, you do need a cable login to start...

Our Four Favorite Companies From The 500 Startups Demo Day

TechCrunch - 1 hour 15 min ago
 Time just keeps flying by, as it’s already demo day for 500 Startups’s tenth batch of companies. We spent the better part of this afternoon watching the 29 companies in the accelerator’s latest batch put their best face forward for a group of investors at Microsoft’s campus in Mountain View, Calif., and we’ve rounded up the most exciting companies that presented. Read More

Ebola Does Not Require an "Ebola Czar," Nor Calling Up the National Guard

Slashdot - 1 hour 17 min ago
Lasrick writes: David Ropeik explores risk-perception psychology and Ebola in the U.S. "[O]fficials are up against the inherently emotional and instinctive nature of risk-perception psychology. Pioneering research on this subject by Paul Slovic, Baruch Fischhoff, and others, vast research on human cognition by Daniel Kahneman and colleagues, and research on the brain's fear response by neuroscientists Joseph LeDoux, Elizabeth Phelps, and others, all make abundantly clear that the perception of risk is not simply a matter of the facts, but more a matter of how those facts feel. ... People worry more about risks that are new and unfamiliar. People worry more about risks that cause greater pain and suffering. People worry more about threats against which we feel powerless, like a disease for which there is no vaccine and which has a high fatality rate if you get it. And people worry more about threats the more available they are to their consciousness—that is, the more aware people are of them."

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Vine for iOS now lets you follow channels to get their best videos

Engadget - 1 hour 37 min ago
Vine is full of video creators talented enough to score TV deals, but keeping up with them has usually meant either following them one-by-one or browsing channels for ages. You have a much easier way to catch up on those clips as of today, though:...

Google Leads $542m Funding Round For Augmented Reality Wearables Company

Slashdot - 2 hours 37 sec ago
An anonymous reader writes: After rumors broke last week, Magic Leap has officially closed the deal on a $542 million Series B investment led by Google. The company has been extremely tight-lipped about what they're working on, but some digging reveals it is most likely an augmented reality wearable that uses a lightfield display. "Using our Dynamic Digitized Lightfield Signal, imagine being able to generate images indistinguishable from real objects and then being able to place those images seamlessly into the real world," the company teases. Having closed an investment round, Magic Leap is now soliciting developers to create for their platform and hiring a huge swath of positions.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Google Leads $542m Funding Round For Augmented Reality Wearables Company

Slashdot - 2 hours 37 sec ago
An anonymous reader writes: After rumors broke last week, Magic Leap has officially closed the deal on a $542 million Series B investment led by Google. The company has been extremely tight-lipped about what they're working on, but some digging reveals it is most likely an augmented reality wearable that uses a lightfield display. "Using our Dynamic Digitized Lightfield Signal, imagine being able to generate images indistinguishable from real objects and then being able to place those images seamlessly into the real world," the company teases. Having closed an investment round, Magic Leap is now soliciting developers to create for their platform and hiring a huge swath of positions.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








FTC appoints privacy consultant as its new Chief Technologist

Engadget - 2 hours 14 min ago
The Federal Trade Commission has just appointed Ashkan Soltani, an independent consultant on privacy and security matters, as its new Chief Technologist. Soltani's most recent accomplishments include contributing to the Washington Post's coverage on...

All that money Yahoo spent on mobile is paying off

Engadget - 2 hours 42 min ago
There's no doubt about it: the future is mobile, and it looks like Yahoo's finally making the pocket-friendly needle move. The company's quarterly earnings dropped not too long ago, in which CEO Marissa Mayer pointed out that Yahoo's mobile revenue...

The Future of Stamps

Slashdot - 2 hours 43 min ago
New submitter Kkloe writes: Wired is running a profile of a gadget called Signet, which is trying to bring postage stamps into the age of high technology. Quoting: "At its core, it is a digital stamp and an app. If you want to send a parcel, you'd simply stamp it with a device that uses a laser to etch it with your name and a unique identifying pattern. After that, the USPS would pick up your package; from there, the app would prompt you to provide the name of the person you're trying to reach." I'm curious whether such a finely-detailed etching can even survive a journey. How far can you expect it to travel before all the handling and sorting make the mark unreadable to the sorting machines in the delivery office? Then you'd have to worry the post office would mark it as a fraudulent stamp (as someone has to pay for the shipping in some way) and either return it or throw it away.

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Hands-On With The Nexus 6 And Android Lollipop

TechCrunch - 2 hours 44 min ago
 Smack dab in the middle of last week, Google announced two new pieces of shiny: the Nexus 6 phone, and the Nexus 9 tablet. Alas, both announcements came by way of blog post, rather than the standard fanfare-filled physical event — meaning no one actually got to touch the devices. Until now! Read More

Hands-On With The Nexus 9 Tablet

TechCrunch - 2 hours 44 min ago
 The Nexus 9 in a nutshell: it’s big, and it’s beautiful. I got to spend a few fleeting minutes with the device this afternoon, and though we plan to have a full review in the coming days, I thought I’d share my initial thoughts. Like the jump from Nexus 5 to Nexus 6, there’s a pretty huge spike in quality and build feel from the Nexus 7 to the Nexus 9. The predecessor… Read More

MLB is bringing Apple Pay to the 2014 World Series

Engadget - 3 hours 9 min ago
Tonight, Kansas City Royals and San Francisco Giants will begin battling it out for Major League Baseball's biggest prize: the World Series. And to make things better for ballpark attendees, MLB and MasterCard have announced that Kauffman Stadium...

The Bogus Batoid Submarine is Wooden, not Yellow (Video)

Slashdot - 3 hours 26 min ago
This is a "wet" submarine. It doesn't try to keep water out. You wear SCUBA gear while pedaling it. And yes, it is powered by a person pushing pedals. That motion, through a drive train, makes manta-style wings flap. This explains the name, since rays are Batoids, and this sub is a fake Batoid, not a real one. It's a beautiful piece of work, and Martin Plazyk is obviously proud to show it off. He and his father, Bruce, operate as Faux Fish Technologies. Follow that link and you'll see many photos, along with a nice selection of videos showing their creations not just in static above-water displays, but in their natural (underwater) element. Meanwhile, here on Slashdot, Martin tells how Faux Fish subs are made. (Alternate Video Link)

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From Friendster to Facebook: Social networking do's and don'ts

Engadget - 3 hours 43 min ago
Have you ever heard of Pownce? How about Jaiku? Maybe even something called Yahoo 360? If you haven't, don't worry. You're probably not alone. These are just a few of the many social networks that have come and gone, most of them vanishing either...

Yahoo Beats In Q3 With Revenue Of $1.09B, EPS Of $0.52

TechCrunch - 3 hours 50 min ago
 With all eyes on what Yahoo will do with its $5 billion+ in Alibaba cash, Yahoo today reported its Q3 earnings after the close of trading, with sales of $1.09 billion excluding traffic acquisition costs and non-GAAP earnings per share of $0.52. Revenues including acquisition costs were $1.15 billion. Yahoo’s stock was up 3% in after-hours trading, following this news. Analysts were… Read More

Samsung Acknowledges and Fixes Bug On 840 EVO SSDs

Slashdot - 4 hours 12 min ago
Lucas123 writes: Samsung has issued a firmware fix for a bug on its popular 840 EVO triple-level cell SSD. The bug apparently slows read performance tremendously for any data more than a month old that has not been moved around on the NAND. Samsung said in a statement that the read problems occurred on its 2.5-in 840 EVO SSDs and 840 EVO mSATA drives because of an error in the flash management software algorithm. Some users on technical blog sites, such as Overclock.net, say the problem extends beyond the EVO line. They also questioned whether the firmware upgrade was a true fix or if it just covers up the bug by moving data around the SSD.

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Sean Parker's post-wedding punishment includes making a beach-finding app

Engadget - 4 hours 16 min ago
A few things happened after Napster co-founder and former Facebook president Sean Parker got married in a gorgeous redwood forest in Big Sur, California. The California Coastal Commission took him to task for creating a bizarre fantasy realm without...

NPR: '80s Ads Are Responsible For the Lack of Women Coders

Slashdot - 4 hours 54 min ago
gollum123 writes: Back in the day, computer science was as legitimate a career path for women as medicine, law, or science. But in 1984, the number of women majoring in computing-related subjects began to fall, and the percentage of women is now significantly lower in CS than in those other fields. NPR's Planet Money sought to answer a simple question: Why? According to the show's experts, computers were advertised as a "boy's toy." This, combined with early '80s geek culture staples like the book Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution, as well as movies like War Games and Weird Science, conspired to instill the perception that computers were primarily for men.

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